Welcome to the official website of violinist Stanislav Pronin

“…Stanislav Pronin brilliantly displayed his outstanding virtuosity, but even more important was his natural way of getting various musical aspects and ideas across clearly… Collaboration with Weilerstein and the Aarhus Symphony Orchestra was superb… The Shostakovich concerto certainly proved to be the highlight of the evening… Stanislav Pronin’s two solo encores…”

– John Christiansen, Aarhus, Denmark, September 2012
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Listen to Concert Highlights

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“Stanislav Pronin stood confidently in his buttoned up black concert outfit… His performance of the concerto was full of dark drama, his tone exceptionally emotional and colorful… The collaboration between the American conductor and the Russian-born soloist was truly eminent and definitely the highlight of the program… The soloist was called in again for an encore…”

– Kurt H. Jorgensen, Herning, Denmark, September 2012
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“I enjoyed listening to [Stanislav’s] solo violin (almost solo!!) CD very much! I don’t think I ever imagined that I wouldn’t get bored listening to a solo violinist. Bravo!”

– Vladimir Ashkenazy, review of Violin For One (2011)

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“This is…an intriguing recital: Pronin puts Milstein’s famous tour de force through its paces and finds dark corners in the sumptuous beauties of Ysaÿe. Pronin even scores by playing both parts in the Prokofiev; the out-of-body experience arouses the music’s emotional content in an attractively unsettling way…Pronin attaches ‘extramusical imagery’ to the piece, and writes of ‘dancing snowflake patterns, shiny and brilliant yet quite delicate’. It’s a window on Prokofiev’s Russian soul, and Pronin’s own.”

– The Gramophone, review of Violin For One (2011)
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“[Pronin] performed the concerto for Violin and Orchestra as if it were his soul coming through the warm, resonant 18th century violin.He manipulated the instrument if it were an extension of his arm and soul. Every passage was vibrant and flawlessly execute with the verve of youth and the skills of generations.”

– Magnus Blecohr
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“Carrying one’s own weight as a solo violinist is not an easy feat, but Stanislav Pronin makes it seem so. This self-assured, confident violinist performs a number of classics from the solo violin repertory, and even accompanies himself on a Prokofiev sonata for two violins. His crisp, sharp bow attacks are clean and bright on Paganiniana, which is, in a sense, variations upon variations. This style of bowing comes across as a bit too precise and not fluid enough on the Ysaÿe sonata, where each note is very distinct, but Pronin’s command of the music is quite exciting to listen to. A more romantic, lush sound can be heard in the first part of the Ciaccona; some might object to Bach being played so lavishly, but Pronin makes the piece his own, creating his own dramatic interpretation. His fierce, attacking style returns in the second part of the piece, but his tremendous energy somehow seems to allow one to overlook the technique and admire his musicianship. Schnittke’s A Paganini is an unusual work, with interesting rhythms and musical quotes here and there. The odd middle section is not the most melodic of musical passages, for it comes across rather like tuning a violin. This is no reflection on the violinist, but instead a credit to his versatility. Pronin performs both violin parts in the Prokofiev Sonata for 2 violins in C major, which is a complex work with many emotional facets. The dark, tortured feel of the Andante is created by its unusual tonality, and the contrast in moods in the Allegro concludes with enjoyable cacophony. The Commodo reveals a very different side to Pronin, which is light, sweet, and lyrical, taking the listener on an aural journey through interweaving lines. The final movement, the Allegro con brio, features bold chords and captures a sense of play, thanks to the violinist’s spirit.”

– V. Vasan, review of Violin For One (2011)

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“…One of the guests was the amazing violinist Stanislav Pronin. Of Russian-Israeli background, his approach to Eastern European works is contradictory. Rather than the usually heavy-handed tziganer technique, his touch is light. Bowing is effortless; his physical manner buoyant and at ease. Both with his Tchaikovsky work and then the a typical Ravel Rhapsody Pronin was totally at home…”

– Ontario Arts Review